Category Archives: Hollywood

Illusionist David Blaine Crosses His OWN Line, Shoots Himself in Mouth When Stunt Goes Wrong!

David Blaine
David Blaine

*Damn David, you’re my favorites, but WTF?  If you’re a magic buff like I am, you no doubt know who David Blaine is. Blaine is the amazing illusionist and endurance artist who never wasted time on stupid card tricks. No, he started off blowing folks’ minds levitating; doing crazy things like walking on water (no offense, Jesus), being buried alive and even hanging upside down for 40 hours. He definitely thinks out of the box, But this time he went too far and almost killed himself. He shot himself in the mouth.

I’ll give you a minute to absorb that.

You a’iight? Due to extreme luck, or whatever you may choose to call it…so is he.

Blaine’s stunt actually went wrong during his Beyond Magic show last November. But it was only broadcast on E4 on Saturday night during a clip showing him spitting frogs out of his mouth into the audience.

Yeah, he can be pretty gross too. Continue reading

‘A Great Day in Black Hollywood’ Honors Filmmakers as 2017 BHERC Festival Opens

bherc-logo

(Hollywood, CA) – The Black Hollywood Education and Resource Center (BHERC) opens its 23rd Annual African American Film Marketplace (AAFM) and S.E. Manly Short Film Showcase with a Gala Celebration “A Great Day in Black Hollywood,” Friday, January 13, at the Harmony Gold Preview House, 7655 W. Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90046.   This popular event honors outstanding professionals in film and will premiere over 66 short films during the 2017 S.E. Manly Film Showcase.

 The 2017 class of honorees are: Preston L. Holmes, Producer/Director, “The Ivan Dixon Award of Achievement;” Lillian Benson, Film Editor, “Lifetime Achievement Award;” Darryl McCane, Filmmaker and Youth Film Instructor, the “President’s Award” and Vanessa Williams, veteran actress, “Community Service Award.”

 BHERC is pleased to award Lillian Benson with the “BHERC Lifetime Achievement Award” for her groundbreaking film work, longevity and continued contributions to the film industry. 

Lillian Benson (Editor) is a native of New York. Her body of work as a television, video and feature film editor spans almost thirty years.  Ms. Benson is the first African-American female editor selected to be a member of the American Cinema Editors (ACE), the internationally recognized honorary society of film editors, where she serves as a member on the Board of Directors. She is also a member of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and the International Documentary Association.  Continue reading

Pranksters Decide to Change ‘Hollywood’ Sign to ‘Hollyweed’ for a Day!

 

 

hollyweed

*Oh boy.  And to think I was just apologizing to a visitor: “Too bad we can’t take you up to see the Hollywood sign,” as we traveled down the famed street in Los Angeles — with them looking at the handprints in cement in from of the old Mann’s Chinese Theater (now ‘TCL’ sumpthin’); as the children took pictures with the likes of Batman, Mickey & Minnie, Edward Scissorhands, The Joker and the man with the huge yellow snake.

I am so glad I didn’t point for them to actually look up. 

I can just hear the children now. “Mommy, THAT doesn’t spell Hollywood.” Continue reading

Free Events! Whose Stories? Who Tells Them? Series Begins January 19

bee-luther-hatchee

*The following events are presented in connection with the play Bee-luther-hatchee, which runs at Sierra Madre Playhouse from January 13 through February 18.

Whose Stories? Who Tells Them? Is a series of five panel discussions on Writers and Diversity, presented on five consecutive Thursday nights at 7:00 p.m., starting on January 19. The panels will be held at different venues (see below) and all events in the series will be free to the public.

Diane Siegel, Curator of Special Programs for Sierra Madre Playhouse, states, “The play Bee-luther-hatchee by Thomas Gibbons is a story of writers and writing, stories that deserve to be told, and the issue of who is best to tell them.  The play provokes discussion on race, identity, and the power of writing. Sierra Madre Playhouse is presenting these panels in the community to provide a broader stage for discussion of issues raised in Gibbons’ play.

Storytellers working across several genres including fiction writing, journalism, social media, drama and poetry will focus on the challenges of creating authentic voices and the danger of cultural appropriation. These issues reach beyond the theater and by holding these panels we hope to provide room for discussion that perhaps can lead to dialogue. We are at a unique time in history and discussion of these themes and the power of writing seems crucial to supporting civil discourse in a time of increasing polarization.” Continue reading