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Study: Millennials Are Buying Homes, Heading To The Suburbs

Branded as the always-on-the-move generation, Millennials may be breaking their own stereotypes and settling down in the burbs. According to a survey released last month by Zillow, this young generation made up 42% of homebuyers in 2016, more than Generation X and Baby Boomers. Most of these 18- to 34-year-olds were buying for the first time.

Zillow reported in a press release that the median age for becoming a homeowner is now 33, while it was 29 in the previous generation. As Millennials are buying homes slightly later in life, they are also breaking the mold in other areas. Of these home seekers, 50% are choosing to settle in the suburbs, 33% in cities, and 20% in rural areas. When Millienials choose to move out of their current home, 64% stay in the same city, while just 7% leave their current state.

Contrary to their Generation X predecessors, however, Millennials seem to be starting smaller. According to Zillow, they are purchasing homes that are 1,800 square feet on average, similar to their grandparents. They are also choosing townhouses and homes with “shared community amenities” more often than other generations.

“We’re constantly learning about this young group of home buyers — we’re finding that they are more similar to older generations than many thought,” Jeremy Wachsman, Zillow Group chief marketing officer said in the press release. “Their views on community and homeownership are pretty traditional, and they don’t all fit the urban stereotype you might have in your head.”

Millennials seem to be prioritizing future planning. In a recent study, 40% of Millennials showed interest in long term care and life insurance policies, while just 25% of all consumers expressed interest. This attitude is also playing into their homebuying strategy. According to a recent Harvard University study on homeowner age demographics and remodeling, Milliennials are purchasing homes with improvement in mind.

“Although slower to move into homeownership than previous generations, millennials are poised to enter the remodeling market in greater force, buying up older, more affordable homes in need of renovations,” the researchers wrote in a press release.

The housing market will likely respond significantly to the influx of this young generation, Wacksman said.

“Millennials have delayed home buying more than earlier generations, but don’t underestimate their impact on the housing market now that they’re buying,” he said. “As members of this huge generation start moving into the next stage of life, expect the homeownership rate to tick up and suburbs to change to suit their urban tastes.”

Why One Author Is Calling The Baby Boomers ‘Sociopaths’

One author is pointing his finger at one of history’s largest generations. In his new book, “A Generation of Sociopaths: How the Baby Boomers Betrayed America,” Bruce Cannon Gibney argues that “America was hijacked by the Boomers, a generation whose reckless self-indulgence degraded the foundations of American prosperity.”

Cover Photo via Goodreads
Cover Photo via Goodreads

The Huffington Post reports that the central theme of the book is the boomers’ lack of consideration for future generations, crafting a future in favor of their own interests. In an interview with WBUR, Gibney points at their handling of social services.

“One of the key indicators for sociopathy is a lack of empathy,” he said. “So you just don’t care for people other than yourselves. So in the case of Social Security, the Social Security Administration projects the trust fund will be depleted in 2034, but by 2034 the median boomer will be dead.”

It is also predicted that by 2030, six out of 10 members of this aging generation will have a chronic condition, further complicating this issue. Broadening this generational blame, Gibney also targets baby boomer politicians and their constituents for deepening national debt.

“It is the boomers as political actors who presided over the policies that allowed the national debt to become so large,” he said. “So in the 1970s, there was actually a great deal of hand-wringing over this sort of catastrophic level of debt, 35 percent of GDP. And 40 years on, the problem is substantially worse and there’s no discussion of the debt whatsoever.”

Despite placing this responsibility on the older generation, Gibney is looking at younger generations with hope as society continues to point out their differences. For example, younger members of the population seem to be more money-conscious. More than half of Millennials and Gen Xers saying that finances are preventing them from taking leisure time, while only 45% of Boomers agree. Noticing these differing ideologies, Gibney thinks that Millennials have the potential to repair that damage that has been done.

“Young people do seem to embrace an empathetic agenda, up to and including supporting senior entitlements, I think in part because they’ve been misled about it,” he said in the interview with WBUR. “They’re certainly much more progressive about climate change and civil rights than the boomers are. So I am hopeful, but it will be some time before they’re in control.”

OSHA Warns That Live Music Really Does Cause Hearing Loss

people at a concertThe U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has of strict rules to regulate work in the United States. For example, OSHA states that cranes must be assembled on firm, drained, and properly graded ground. They also regulate the use of hardhats around construction sites, and even workplace noise.

And that means international superstars like Beyoncé have to follow OSHA’s rules just like everyone else. Continue reading

Portland, Oregon’s Rose City Yarn Crawl is Every Knitting Lover’s Dream

knitting-1430153_960_720The record for the most people knitting simultaneously happened in September 2012 in Royal Albert Hall, London, when 3,083 people knitted together for 15 minutes. However, that record may soon be beat by the Rose City Yarn Crawl knitters, who congregate in the greater Portland area every year to celebrate the four-day knitting extravaganza.

The Rose City Yarn Crawl involves thousands upon thousands of knitters, crocheters, and spinners getting their ‘passports’ stamped as they try to visit every one of the 13 participating fabric and knitting shops. If they manage to hit every one, they’ll be entered to win a grand prize. Each store involved has sales and incentives for buyers to attend, purchase some materials, and get their passports stamped.

The tradition was born in 2009 and has developed into a citywide celebration. The last event, which ran from March 2 to March 5, was expected to be the biggest one yet. Last year’s Rose City Yarn Crawl had 4,500 attendees, and over the four days, participating stores documented more than 17,100 customers. Continue reading

Study Finds Lack of Exercise Increases Risk of Dementia

Dementia is a serious mental disorder that affects more than 5.4 million Americans. Sadly, in addition to aging, physical conditions like hair loss and obesity could also be related to this debilitating disease.

According to a new study, lack of exercise could also have a direct relation to dementia.

“Being inactive may completely negate the protective effects of a healthy set of genes,” said Jennifer Heisz, an assistant professor in the department of kinesiology at McMaster University and a lead researcher on a new Canadian study.

The five-year study looked at more than 1,600 adults aged 65 and older and found that individuals who spend too much time on the couch have the same risk of developing dementia as those genetically predisposed to the condition. The predisposed people carry the apolipoprotein (APOE) gene mutation, which significantly increases the chance of developing dementia later in life. In fact, it’s the strongest genetic risk factor for dementia, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s disease.

The type of exercise needed to fight off dementia isn’t known; however, the study suggests that even rudimentary physical activity could help, as the physically active study participants reported walking at least three times a week.

“Which means you don’t have to train like an Olympian to get the brain health benefits of being physically active,” Heisz added.

Problems with hair loss are often related to dementia as well, but it’s important to keep in mind that hair loss doesn’t always lead to mental health issues. Hair loss is becoming more and more common in younger people, who are far from showing any signs of dementia and other mental health-related problems. Roughly 40% of men experience noticeable hair loss before they turn 35 years old.

Unfortunately for the prematurely hairless, eHealthMe does report that hair loss is commonly found among people with dementia. The most common factors of dementia patients who also experience hair loss are being female, being over the age of 60, and having high cholesterol levels.

The increasing number of Americans with dementia has also taken a toll on the nation’s health care system. Pharmacy Times reports people with dementia — along with younger men, people with lower income, and people of color — are more likely to seek emergency care for non-emergency conditions like common eye problems.

A University of Michigan study looked at roughly 377,000 eye-related emergency room visits over a 14-year period and found that nearly 86,500 of those visits were for issues that did not require emergency treatment.

Of course, people who are experiencing serious dementia symptoms should consult a medical professional. In addition to primary care physicians, patients can get medical attention at urgent care clinics. About 60% of urgent care centers have wait times less than 15 minutes and 65% have an on-site physician at all times. Instead, many older Americans with dementia end up in emergency rooms.

To limit the risks of dementia, there are steps young people can take. Monitoring physical activity, keeping track of potential symptoms, and seeking professional medical attention are all important aspects of fighting off dementia.

“I tell all my patients that if they leave with one, and only one, piece of advice,” said Dr. Sam Gandy, director of the Center for Cognitive Health ant Mount Sinai Hospital, “one thing that they can do to reduce their risk of dementia or slow the progression of dementia is to exercise.”

Super Chill New Jersey Judge Says Employers Must Pay for Medical Marijuana

MarijuanaWhile 85% of worker’s compensation claims are attributed to employees slipping on slick floors, Andrew Watson’s situation was a little bit different. He crushed his hand working in the construction sector, but that’s not the only thing that sets his worker’s compensation case apart.

Watson began using medical marijuana back in 2014 after he severely injured his hand in a power saw accident, which occurred years earlier in 2008. After his doctor-prescribed opioids were no longer treating his chronic neuropathic pain, Watson enrolled himself in New Jersey’s state-funded medical marijuana program. He tried to buy more than two ounces of the drug, but when both his insurance and employer refused to pay, Watson contacted the state’s worker’s compensation system.

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 23 states and the District of Columbia currently allow medical marijuana use, including New Jersey. But prices differ for each state, and one ounce of cannabis in New Jersey averages at around $498. This price doesn’t account for the state’s 7% sales tax, making it the highest-priced medical marijuana in the nation.

So, in order to stay away from highly addictive opioids, Watson took his case to New Jersey’s Supreme Court, saying that the state’s worker’s compensation program should be held responsible. In a groundbreaking settlement, Judge Ingrid French ruled in favor of Watson, claiming cannabis was “reasonable and necessary” for his pain management. Now, his former employer Gallagher Bassett will be paying for his treatments.

In her final statements, French explained that she passed the ruling because it would reduce his use of oral narcotics, prevent opioid dependence, promote a better quality of life, and provide healing in a holistic way. She explained to NJ.com:

“The evidence presented in these proceedings show that the petitioner’s ‘trial’ use of medicinal marijuana has been successful. While the court is sensitive to the controversy surrounding the medicinal use of marijuana, whether or not it should be prescribed for a patient in a state where it is legal to prescribe it is a medical decision that is within the boundaries of the laws in the state.”

In light of this ruling, Watson’s lawyer Phillip Faccenda is quick to explain that his client is not trying to take advantage of New Jersey’s medical marijuana law, but rather get the best care possible without the help of narcotic drugs.

Back in 2010, New Jersey enacted a law that recognizes six diseases that will qualify patients for medical marijuana, so long as they also have a doctor’s prescription. This includes Lou Gehrig’s disease, multiple sclerosis, terminal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, muscular dystrophy, and any other terminal diseases with a life expectancy of less than a year.

It should also be noted that those with HIV or AIDS, seizure disorders including epilepsy, glaucoma, intractable skeletal muscular spasticity, chronic pain, and post-traumatic stress disorder can also qualify in special cases. However, they can only be approved for medical marijuana use if conventional treatments have already failed.va-constrck

The judge’s ruling is expected to have a minimal impact on employers across the state, as the specifications of the 2010 law are very hard to meet. As of right now, representatives for Gallagher Basset have agreed to the ruling, and there will be no appeal.

The only other state where medical marijuana can be covered by worker’s compensation is New Mexico, where one patient’s lawyer argued that the courts made “an important decision for workers so seriously injured they would be bound to a lifetime of narcotic medications.”

Study Finds Social Media Users Are Obsessed With Their Dogs

It’s official: social media users are paw-sitively obsessed with their pups.

A new study released by BarkBox found that dog owners post photos of or talk about their furry friends six times per week on average. Nationwide, 46.3 million households have a dog, so having a canine companion is quite common. However, it may surprise some to know that out of the 1,000 dog parents surveyed, 11% have actually created a social media account specifically for their pooch.

Some have speculated that one of the main reasons dog owners love posting these photos and videos is because we consider our pets to be part of the family. Stacie Grissom, head of content at BarkBox, noted, “In our parents’ generation, a dog may have been kept largely in the yard and you greeted it in the morning and when you came home from work. Now the dog is [on] the Christmas cards.”

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Sorry Hipsters, But Your Interior Design Ideas Are On the Outs

Modern cream coloured kitchenInterior designers from all over the world have come to a conclusion: hipster-inspired furniture is on the outs.

So what exactly is “hipster furniture”? According to design aficionados, this means dark reclaimed wood, pastel hues, and anything that looks recycled; these are being traded in for fresher, more sophisticated pieces.

For hipsters looking to redecorate, the Wall Street Journal details some of the new interior design trends that are projected to become huge this upcoming year.

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