All posts by Contributor

Relax: Science Finally Proves That Taking a Bath Is Good For You

For years, heat has been used as a method of relaxation. Whether it is through taking a bath, sitting in a sauna, or hanging out in a hot tub, many people throughout the ages have taken a bath to feel relaxed. While these activities have mostly been used as a way to decompress, doctors and researchers have actually found evidence that these heat therapy practices can actually bring a host of health benefits.
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3D Printing Has The Power To Change The Medical Field, Starting With Your Teeth

The concept of 3D printing sounds like something out of a sci-fi film, but it has the real-life potential to change the way we eat, interact, and even heal. The entire medical field could be impacted by this emerging technology in ways we might never have considered. Everything from prosthetic limbs to human tissue replacement can be created with a 3D printer. And in many cases, these offerings may be preferential to both doctors and patients.

One of the most surprising areas where 3D printing can be used? Right in your mouth. Continue reading

Flood Water Might Carry Diseases, Say Health Officials

Hurricane Harvey continues its assault on the southern coast of the U.S., bringing massive amounts of rain and incredible winds. And while the flooding might be a major concern to many, health officials are worried about what the water holds.

One of the biggest dangers that accompany flooding, especially flooding of this caliber, is that the water might lead to a sewage influx. This is when the sewer systems of the local area get drawn into the water above ground, creating a very large health concern. And that’s why health officials in Texas and similarly affected areas are beginning to warn people to stay out of the water.

Floodwater acts as a sponge for hazards, collecting sharp objects, insects and wildlife, and human waste. The water can be immensely dangerous to swim in for any period of time, especially if one has a cut or an open wound. But avoiding the water when it’s raging around and there are no other options is difficult.

This is something that the Texas Department of State Health Services understands, and spokesman Chris Van Deusen admitted that, although his group is advising the avoidance of flood waters, “of course, people have had to be in the water ? they haven’t had a choice.”

Another major concern with the floodwater is tetanus, an infection caused by bacteria in soil, dust, and manure. It enters the body through a cut or a puncture wound and creates a poison that causes painful muscle contractions. With all the dirt that is moving around in the water and the increased risk for injury, the bacteria have plenty of chances to infect people.

“The bacterial count in floodwater is extremely high. The chance of getting a skin infection is really quite serious,” said Richard Bradley, the chief of emergency medical services and disaster medicine at the University of Texas’ McGovern Medical School.

Texas health officials are doing everything that they can to get people the medical assistance that they need to fight this infection. They’ve been urging the people in Texas to get their tetanus booster shot, and also sending supplies for the vaccine to severely flooded areas.

Hopefully, the people of Texas manage to avoid disease and sickness, and the cleanup isn’t too expensive. But given that the average construction site clean up can cost between $150 and $950, it can be assumed this will have a heavy price-tag. There are entire communities devastated by Hurricane Harvey.

Luckily, the people of Texas appear to have officials that care to help.

Bicycle-Related Fatalities Increase On National Scale, But Will States Respond?

Bicycling is undoubtedly a beloved American pastime, and its popularity only continues to rise. In 2015 alone, 36 million Americans over the age of seven rode a bike six times or more. But unfortunately, as cycling becomes more prevalent, bicycle-related deaths do, too. And while a national report has found that bike fatalities are on an upsurge, many states aren’t exactly sure how to fix the problem. Continue reading

Tormund From Game of Thrones Is Beardless, And It’s Amazing Everyone

Sometimes an item or look becomes part of someone, to the point where one can’t distinguish them without it. It could be a particular piece of clothing, hair style, hair color, or just a way they move. The point is that it’s them, and when they lose it it’s impossible to see them the same way.

That was the case when Game of Thrones actor Kristofer Hivju, known for playing the fan-favorite character Tormund Giantsbane in the show, had pictures of himself without his iconic beard released online.

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American Sailors Missing After Naval Ship Collides With Oil Tanker

Ten American sailors went missing on Sunday, August 20, after a collision with a cargo ship. The American missile destroyer, USS John S. McCain, collided with a 183m-long oil tanker, Alnic MC, at 10:24 AM (NZT) along the coast of eastern Singapore.

A week later on Monday, August 28, the remains of all ten missing sailors were found. The navy said that all 10 of the men died within the destroyer.

The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 1972 was created to prevent collisions between shipping vessels. Today, 95% of the world’s cargo is transported by ship, and international shipping lanes are more crowded than ever.

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Can We Actually Learn in Our Sleep? Researchers Say Yes

It is the dream of many a college student — to doze off and learn course material while you sleep. While this may seem like an unrealistic pipe dream, new research has shown that this may actually be more realistic than one might think.

New research published in the journal Nature Communications shows that it is possible for someone to form auditory memories while sleeping. To come to this exciting conclusion, researchers played complex sound patterns while test subjects were sleeping to see if their memory could actually remember these patterns once awake. And it turned out they did — the sleepers were able to recognize with perfect accuracy the noises they heard in their sleep.
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