Finally! Samsung Has ID’d the Cause of ‘Galaxy Note 7’ Fires

Koh Dong-jin, head of Samsung's mobile devices division
Koh Dong-jin, head of Samsung’s mobile devices division

*I pray you were not one of the unfortunate victims of a phone that caught fire…while you were on it! By now you’ve probably heard that Samsung had to pull their Galaxy Note 7 from the market only months after it’s August 2 launch. People all over the globe were bombarding the brand with complaints about their phone blowing up and catching fire; many of them landed in hospitals. Even airports laid out huge blinking signs advising folks not to expect to bring the phones on board, and confiscated them from those who did.

Samsung was devastated. They had already counted all the money and now was set to invest in lawsuits. Quietly they bowed out by taking the phone off the shelf — rushing it into research to learn what the hell had happened.

On Monday the answers came.

According to Samsung Electronics in Seoul, South Korea, 700 researchers and engineers were assembled to test upwards of 200, 000 Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones, and defects were found in two sets of batteries from two different manufacturers which made the device vulnerable to catch fire.

The process involved  more than 30,000 batteries which replicated what happened with the Note 7 phones in an attempt to pin down why some of the phones were overheating.

Because the Galaxy Note 7 has one of the biggest battery capacities to date for smartphones at 3,500 mAh, or milliampere hour, you’d think that had something to do with the malfunction, but according to Samsung, it didn’t.

Samsung’s mobile division president, Koh Dong-jin, ruled out any problems with other aspects of the Note 7, either in its hardware or its software. He said Samsung would use what it learned from its investigations to improve lithium ion battery safety for the industry, though analysts questioned if the company had really gotten to the heart of the problem.

Analysts are still skeptical, and question if the company had really gotten to the heart of the problem. But Dong-jin said Samsung will use what was concluded from its investigations to improve lithium ion battery safety for the industry.

Convinced much?

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