‘Your Honor, My Husband Has No Real Address’…Judge Says Serve Divorce Papers on Facebook

Facebook you've been served

*Dang. Imagine opening up your Facebook account and the first thing you see is a message saying, You’ve been served! Now that’s one for the record books. But it happened. When a Brooklyn woman seeking a divorce from her elusive husband told the judge he didn’t have an address where he could be properly served, the judge gave her approval to do so on Facebook.

It was a landmark ruling when Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Matthew Cooper allowed Ghanaian  nurse Ellanora Baidoo to serve husband Victor Sena Blood-Dzraku with divorce papers using the social media site. Baidoo, 26, “is granted permission serve defendant with the divorce summons using a private message through Facebook,” with her lawyer messaging the man through Baidoo’s account, Cooper wrote.

“This transmittal shall be repeated by plaintiff’s attorney to defendant once a week for three consecutive weeks or until acknowledged” by her hard-to-find hubby.

“I think it’s new law, and it’s necessary,” said Baidoo’s lawyer, Andrew Spinnell.

His client and Blood-Dzraku married in a civil ceremony back in 2009, but their relationship went astray after Blood-Dzraku reneged on his promise to have a traditional Ghanaian wedding ceremony as well, Spinnell said.

Both are from Ghana.

Victor Sena Blood-Dzraku, (seen in a Facebook photo below), told wife he has no fixed address and has only kept in touch with her by phone and the social networking site.

Husband served on facebook

I suppose the biggest renege was a marriage ceremony without family present. “She wanted their families there,” the lawyer said.

As a result, the wedding was never consummated and the couple never lived together, the lawyer said — but Blood-Dzraku apparently still doesn’t want a divorce. And kept in touch with his wife by phone and Facebook — but that was it, the ruling says.

The “last address plaintiff has for defendant is an apartment that he vacated in 2011,” Cooper said. Baidoo “has spoken with defendant by telephone on occasion and he has told her that he has no fixed address and no place of employment. He has also refused to make himself available to be served with divorce papers.”

The “post office has no forwarding address for him, there is no billing address linked to his prepaid cell phone, and the Department of Motor Vehicles has no record of him,” the ruling says.

“We tried everything, including hiring a private detective — and nothing,” Spinnell said.

The first Facebook message went out to the husband last week. “So far, he hasn’t responded,” Spinnell said.

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