Black Women: To Be Married Or Not To Be Married?

The question on a lot of women’s minds, whether white or black, is to be married or not to be married?  But there’s a problem when black women shoulder the burden of the plight of the black community falling behind in education, but offering skyrocketing crime and more unwed mothers.  There are crusaders on both sides of the debate that black women should marry, but the consensus appears to be that black women do not want to be held accountable for what they feel is a shortage of black men to marry.

According to MSNBC, the statistics are as follows: 

“The black community’s 72 percent rate eclipses that of most other groups: 17 percent of Asians, 29 percent of whites, 53 percent of Hispanics and 66 percent of Native Americans were born to unwed mothers in 2008, the most recent year for which government figures are available. The rate for the overall U.S. population was 41 percent.”

In addition to those numbers, the black professional woman is even more singled out, (no pun intended), with 70 percent of them being unmarried. Crusaders like Dr. Natalie Carroll, an ob/gyn in Houston that encourages her unwed patients to marry and Christelyn Karazin, who started out as a single mother, is married to a white man and has four children, her first when she was unwed.  She has put together a movement supported by 100 writers and activists for the online movement No Wedding No Womb, which according to MSNBC, she calls “a very simplified reduction of a very complicated issue.”  Her initiative has been widely criticized.

Both women find it absolutely necessary and detrimental to the black community for black women to marry and offer their child a mother and a father.  Amy Wax, is a white woman and law professor at the University of Pennsylvania, whose written the book “Race, Wrongs and Remedies: Group Justice in the 21st Century.” She too feels that black women should marry to save the community.  She goes as far as to say: 

“Blacks as a group will never be equal while they have this situation going on, where the vast majority of children do not have fathers in the home married to their mother, involved in their lives, investing in them, investing in the next generation.”

Now what do you say ladies?  Let us know what YOU think!  Read the full report here!

2 thoughts on “Black Women: To Be Married Or Not To Be Married?”

  1. Your article is truly original and genuine. I think the points you’ve made are solid and interesting. They are views I can agree on and appreciate. Thank you for sharing your knowledge on this subject.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *